Celebrating Tihar – The Festival of Lights

Tihar – The Festival of Lights

Tihar, also known as Deepavali or Diwali, is a popular five-day Hindu festival that celebrates the triumph of good over evil and light over darkness. It is celebrated in various parts of the world, but it holds a special significance in Nepal, India, and other South Asian countries. The festival falls between the months of October and November in the Gregorian calendar, on the fifteenth day of Kartik, the Hindu lunar month. This year, Tihar falls between 5th to 9th November, with each day holding a unique significance and traditions.

Tihar is a time of joy, celebration, and togetherness. The streets are adorned with colorful lights, intricate rangolis (traditional decorative art), and vivid decorations. People exchange gifts, sweets, and offer prayers to the Hindu deity of wealth, Lord Ganesha, and Goddess Laxmi, the symbol of prosperity and abundance. The beautiful and vibrant atmosphere creates a sense of warmth and happiness among people of all ages and social backgrounds.

On the first day of Tihar, people worship crows to honor their connection with Lord Yama, the God of death, and protectors of the soul. The second day is dedicated to the Hindu worship of dogs, known as Kukur Tihar. Dogs are considered as a symbol of loyalty and guardians of homes in Hindu mythology, and they are honored and pampered with flowers, garlands, and delicious treats.

The third day is the main day of Tihar, also known as Laxmi Puja. On this day, people decorate their homes and businesses with lights, candles, and traditional oil lamps called diyas to welcome Goddess Laxmi. It is believed that the Goddess of wealth and prosperity will bring good fortune and blessings to those who follow the traditions and offer prayers with devotion and gratitude. In the evening, families gather for a traditional puja (prayer) ceremony which includes offerings, sweets, and chanting of mantras.

The fourth day of Tihar is known as Govardhan Puja, where cows are considered sacred in Hinduism and are worshipped for their importance in agriculture and providing nourishment. On this day, people offer prayers and treats to cows, decorate their horns with colors and garlands, and perform puja with offerings of rice, flowers, and prayers.

The final day of Tihar, also known as Bhai Tika, celebrates the bond of siblings. Sisters offer prayers and tikas (auspicious red mark) on their brother’s forehead, and in return, brothers offer gifts and blessings. It is also a time for families to come together, share meals, and celebrate this special bond.

Tihar is not just a festival of lights; it is a celebration of love, unity, and traditions. It is a time to reflect on the triumph of good over evil, light over darkness, and to be thankful for the blessings in our lives. As we celebrate Tihar this year, let us also remember to spread love, positivity, and joy to those around us.

Tihar, also known as Deepavali or Diwali, is a popular five-day Hindu festival that celebrates the triumph of good over evil and light over darkness.

The festival falls between the months of October and November in the Gregorian calendar, on the fifteenth day of Kartik, the Hindu lunar month.

On the first day of Tihar, people worship crows to honor their connection with Lord Yama, the God of death, and protectors of the soul.

The second day is dedicated to the Hindu worship of dogs, known as Kukur Tihar.

Dogs are considered as a symbol of loyalty and guardians of homes in Hindu mythology, and they are honored and pampered with flowers, garlands, and delicious treats.

The third day is the main day of Tihar, also known as Laxmi Puja.

It is believed that the Goddess of wealth and prosperity will bring good fortune and blessings to those who follow the traditions and offer prayers with devotion and gratitude.

In the evening, families gather for a traditional puja (prayer) ceremony which includes offerings, sweets, and chanting of mantras.

Tihar is not just a festival of lights; it is a celebration of love, unity, and traditions.

As we celebrate Tihar this year, let us also remember to spread love, positivity, and joy to those around us.

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