Dates of Diwali – Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu Calendar

Diwali – The Festival of Lights

Diwali, also known as Deepavali, is one of the most widely celebrated festivals in India. It is a five-day festival that falls between October and November, with the actual dates varying each year according to the Hindu calendar. The festival is a celebration of the victory of good over evil, light over darkness and knowledge over ignorance.

Origin and History of Diwali

The word ‘Diwali’ comes from the Sanskrit word ‘Deepavali’ meaning ‘a row of lights’. The festival has its origins in the Hindu epic ‘Ramayana’ which tells the story of Lord Rama, his wife Sita, and his brother Lakshmana returning to their kingdom after 14 years of exile. The people of Ayodhya, their kingdom, welcomed them back by lighting diyas (oil lamps) all around the city.

Celebrations During Diwali

The festival of Diwali is celebrated in various ways across different regions in India. However, there are certain customs and traditions that are common to all celebrations. Houses and businesses are decorated with lights, rangolis (decorative designs made with colored powders), and candles. Families gather to perform puja (prayers) to Goddess Lakshmi, the deity of wealth and prosperity.

Four Main Days of Diwali

Diwali is celebrated over a period of five days, but the main festivities happen over four days. The first day, known as Dhanteras, is when people buy new clothes, utensils, and gold as it is considered auspicious. The second day, Naraka Chaturdasi, is when Lord Krishna killed the demon Narakasura and saved the people from his terror. The third day is the main day of the festival, when Diwali is celebrated with lights and prayers. The final day, Bhai Dooj, is dedicated to the bond of love between brothers and sisters.

Diwali in Different Parts of India

Diwali is celebrated in different ways across India, with each region having its unique traditions and customs. In Northern India, people celebrate the return of Lord Rama by lighting diyas, bursting firecrackers, and performing puja to Goddess Lakshmi. In South India, the festival is celebrated as Naraka Chaturdasi, and people prepare special sweets and snacks, exchange gifts, and light diyas. In Eastern India, the festival is celebrated on a grand scale with Kali Puja, where Goddess Kali is worshipped. In Western India, the festival coincides with the Gujarati New Year celebration and is celebrated with a lot of enthusiasm and joy.

The Importance of Diwali

Apart from being a religious festival, Diwali also holds a great cultural significance. It brings together families and communities, spreads joy and positivity, and symbolizes unity and hope. The festival is a reminder to overcome evil and celebrate all that is good in the world.

Diwali is a five-day festival that falls between October and November, with the actual dates varying each year according to the Hindu calendar.

The festival is a celebration of the victory of good over evil, light over darkness, and knowledge over ignorance.

The word ‘Diwali’ comes from the Sanskrit word ‘Deepavali’ meaning ‘a row of lights’.

The festival has its origins in the Hindu epic ‘Ramayana’ which tells the story of Lord Rama, his wife Sita, and his brother Lakshmana returning to their kingdom after 14 years of exile.

The first day, known as Dhanteras, is when people buy new clothes, utensils, and gold as it is considered auspicious.

The final day, Bhai Dooj, is dedicated to the bond of love between brothers and sisters.

Diwali is celebrated in different ways across India, with each region having its unique traditions and customs.

Apart from being a religious festival, Diwali also holds a great cultural significance.

The festival is a reminder to overcome evil and celebrate all that is good in the world.

Dates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu CalendarDates of Diwali - Celebrating the New Year According to the Hindu Calendar

Diwali #celebrations #festivaloflights